Friday, July 27, 2018

Foley Reports on the FDA's Warning About Grain Free Dog Food



I do feel bad for our parents.  There are so many decisions they have to make regarding our health.  Just when they think they have made the right decision the information changes.

After years of eating the same food, two months ago, my parents decided to switch my sisters to grain free food.  River Song had several feet, and ear infections and Pocket often has a bad tummy. Since they made the switch River hasn’t had any allergies and Pocket’s belly has been better.

Success!

Then the stories started.  Grain free food, long promoted as the gold standard of the pet food industry was the common thread in some dogs who were suffering from DCM or dilated cardiomyopathy which makes the heart weaken and become enlarged causing some dogs to suddenly go into heart failure.

There are dogs who are prone to DCM like Doberman pinschers, Irish wolfhounds, boxers and Great Danes.  But recently veterinarians have seen DCM in golden retrievers, doodle mixes, Labrador retrievers and Shih Tzus.  The common factor in many of these cases has been grain free diets, and, in a few cases, a raw diet.
It is not the absence of grains but what is substituted.  Peas, lentils, chickpeas, and potatoes, which replace the grains in grain free food is being looked like the possible culprit.  Some researchers believe that the carbohydrates are blocking the body’s ability to either make taurine or absorb taurine. Many of the most popular grain free brands, including Blue Buffalo, which my sisters eat, contains taurine, an amino acid used to break down fat, which is good, unless the carbohydrates are blocking the taurine, which is bad. Right now researchers don’t know.  Many of the dogs with DCM have low taurine levels, but some have normal levels, deepening the mystery.

No researcher has named a specific brand of food.  They have mentioned the term “boutique brands” meaning those that are made in small batches and not sold in major retail stores.  They also have said exotic proteins like buffalo, kangaroo, and alligator Poultry and beef does contain taurine which helps keep taurine levels up if taurine is the problem.  

Dog food companies have been trying to outdo each other by raising protein levels for years.  Many consumers think protein equals meat, but often protein equals peas or potatoes. Many dog food companies, will split the carbohydrates up and list a few different types of peas or potatoes under ingredients.  This could mean the main source of protein in your dog's food comes from carbs and not meat.

There are millions of dogs who eat grain free food and below one percent are showing symptoms of DCM.    The vets are still not certain if it is a problem for all dogs or for certain ones who have rare biological issues causing the body to react poorly to peas and potatoes.  The research is in the early stages. But the FDA was concerned enough about grain free food that they issued a warning to consumers.

My parents haven’t decided if they should switch back to food with grains.  The vet tech they talked to said she feeds grain free food and sees no reason to stop.  My parents are weighing the possible benefits of grain free for Pocket’s tummy problems and River’s allergies.  They are going to monitor the research and make a decision when it is time to buy the next bag.




Being a dog parent is hard, and with this new controversy about grain free food, it has got harder.

12 comments:

  1. Good post. It is so hard to choose a dog food.

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  2. That's very interesting. The doggies in my family have all eaten the same brand of dry kibble for years and never had any problems. (we do get plenty of snacks and left-overs too. Today I got salmon and rice! Yum!)

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  3. I am a very picky dog. I don't like the same food two days in a row. Now, mom has to cook for me because it seems I will eat cooked chicken breast several days in a row. I will also eat my weight in Milk Bones. Mom says that's like her pulling into Dunkin Donuts and eating her fill of jelly donuts every day. I am fourteen now, so it is hard to tell if grain makes a difference in my health. We did try grain free, but as formerly noted I wouldn't eat it every day, so it is hard to tell if it had any benefits or negatives.

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  4. It sure gets confusing, first it’s good, then not so good. No wonder humans are a bit crazy!

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  5. We agree, it is so very hard. Arty has bad allergies and we found, even with a grain free diet, his allergies continue...

    Les sigh...

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  6. It is the same thing in the human food world. One week something is good for you, the next it is bad. We have had grain-free dog food here for many years and have had good luck with it, or at least we think we have. Interesting about the buffalo, kangaroo, and alligator. We read that kangaroo is supposed to be really good for dogs with food allergies, but Mom thinks that the canned kangaroo food we had as a topper for a little bit recently may have brought on Timber's problems. The vet still thinks it is his kibble. We will see what happens once we transition him off the special kibble he is getting now to the one he was getting before and that Lightning and Misty still eat.

    It sure does make it tough on our humans to know what is the best thing to do for us.

    Woos - Lightning, Misty, and Timber

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  7. We eat mostly grain free food, but it is always hard to know what is best when there is always new information or differing opinions
    hugs
    Hazel & Mabel

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  8. Oh no... R has no choice. His body cannot tolerate grains. Let's hope that none of us have to ever face this. As you point out, 99% of dogs who eat grain-free food are fine.

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  9. OMCs.. we saw that on the news.....along with several recalls on human foods this week. What is up?
    Hugs madi your bfff

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  10. We eat grain free also, mom has tried even more better food and we hated it, she always adds a little salmon to our food so we will eat it. We are picky for pugs ....its hard to be a great parent, and its stressful to know what works. sigh.................mags and gusser

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  11. Thanks for this post. I read about taurine deficiency recently too. My vet isn't keen on grain free foods for healthy dogs. There's so much to think about.

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